Wednesday, January 22, 2020

4064. REYNA. Hamster with an inflamed right eye 3rd eyelid

Thur Jan 23, 2020


Young lady came in to get her hamster's nails cut. She wanted to watch nail cutting.
"The best procedure is to put the hamster flat on the table, with the assistant clipping the nails while sitting on a chair!" I advised. Use a glove hand to prevent bitting.


A rare occurrence.  Lady owner said "no problem" or inconvenience of eyeball rubbing.
3rd eyelid swollen. Redness and inflamed.
Treatment: anti-inflammatory eyedrops for 10 days.




4063. REYNA. Veterinary Stories by Dr Sing Kong Yuen - Expatriates do have a sense of humour


(INTRODUCTION)

NARRATE: Singapore is a busy city-state where many multi-national companies set up
headquarters and employ expatriates to manage them. The Caucasian expatriates are
the niche market for Kenny, the pet taxi transport man. He knows how to interact with the newcomers by cracking
jokes. He tells me his secret in "Expats Do Have a Sense of Humour".







Kenny drives a big van (right) to Toa Payoh Vets for the health
check up of his client's dog




(PART 1). Narrate the text but do NOT insert these two Text Images. Insert at the "Conclusion". Use the existing video footage 99%. Great narration.



(PART 2)




(PART 3. CONCLUSION):  A great sense of humour is very important in servicing the Caucasian expatriates. Kenny makes them laugh and at ease. Hence he gets repeat and referral business in his niche market and is still in business when many Singapore pet taxi drivers have had given up.






INFORMATION ABOUT THE SCRIPT









CREDITS - Narration




This true story was written by Dr Sing Kong Yuen






--------------------------------------

NOTE:
Pronounce "grin" in British English. See google.

-------------------------------------------------------
Overall, the video is great and full of life. It is brilliant idea to use the video footage of the travellers and their Caucasian driver!












IMAGES TO BE USED IF APPLICABLE



Singapore expatriate families in Holland Village in Singapore





--------------------------------------





--------------------------------

USE THESE IMAGES IF APPLICABLE IN CONCLUSION OR ELSEWHERE 












Monday, January 20, 2020

4062. REYNA. To edit this video footage. Not much wildlife in the Esplanade - Gardens on the Bay

WILDLIFE IN SINGAPORE
Butterflies and the Oriental Garden Lizards at The Esplanade - Theatres on the Bay
Dr Sing Kong Yuen, BVMS (Glasgow)
Jan 17, 2020

Forecourt Garden - abundance of flowers (see other video footages and clip some).
During any morning visit, you will rarely see more than a couple of butterflies seen
Oriental Garden Lizards - One or two on the tree or on the grounds dashing away from you.
Bees - a day or two.

Timing and luck. Not the main reason. Why? How?  Urban gardens.
Fogging - so no mosquitoes, dengue fever.

















IMAGES OF ORIENTAL GARDEN LIZARDS SEEN EARLIER


Jan 17, 2020 video is too long.






Edit footage and use the following:
1:09 - 1:38   1:53 - 3:10    Tree 1. lizard seen. Compare to previous ones -- research earlier blogs





3:23 - 4:27                         Tree 2. No lizard today.

5:16 - 5:52                          Tree 3. No lizard today.

6:20 - 7:05   Gardeners upset the balance of environment
                     Fogging, pruning, hosing, trampling around the environment
                     Chemical pesticides affect the eggs laid in the soil or foliage, so very rarely do you see butterflies and bees although there are an abundance of flowers




Butterflies

https://2010vets.blogspot.com/2020/01/4054-butterflies-in-esplanade.html






Sunday, January 19, 2020

4061. How an ear abscessed red-eared slider is treated.

BE KIND TO PETS VETERINARY STORIES
Dr Sing Kong Yuen, BVMS (Glasgow)
Ear Abscesses in red-eared sliders in Singapore
Jan 20, 2020



Red-eared slider 1
Video shows the consultation only.
This slider has an extremely large ear abscess:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DZjILVkxE8E
Treatment is the same as for red-eared slider 1.



Red-eared slider 2


Final video shows the treatment of ear abscess in the red-eared slider. 








Blog
https://2010vets.blogspot.com/2019/02/3424-how-to-treat-ear-abscess-in-red.html

3. Red-eared slider 3.

Final video of surgical treatment of ear abscess at:

https://youtu.be/PPAym2vpA18


4. Ear abscess in several red-eared slider videos





4060. REYNA. Ear abscess, Male terrapin. Complete the video by showing the surgery.



Reyna
You need to search the Pt 1, 3 etc of the videos in Youtube to find the surgery and combine with this video. Complaint of viewers is that they don't see the treatment and are fed up..



If not possible, add this link in to show how ear abscess is treated.




Saturday, January 18, 2020

4059. Video creation. Reyna. Do dogs suffer from toothaches?. Carnassial tooth abscess

BE KIND TO PETS VETERINARY STORIES

DO DOGS SUFFER FROM TOOTHACHES?
The Carnassial Tooth Abscess
Dr Sing Kong Yuen, BVMS (Glasgow)

Dogs do suffer from toothaches. I will say that the most painful one must be the carnassial tooth
abscess. The canine carnassial tooth is the 4th premolar tooth. When there is chronic gingivitis, the bacteria destroys the periodontal ligaments attaching the tooth to the gums. Bacteria destroys the tooth and forms a carnassial tooth abscess. An abscess is a collection of pus.

Carnassial tooth abscess is a common disease in the older dog that has poor dental care. It is very painful. The presenting sign is a festering facial wound below the eye. Pus and blood seep out daily like an active volcano spewing hot lava and ash daily. Home remedies like antibiotic powder and silver cream or antibiotics are ineffective. Most owners think this is just a traumatic wound. But this open wound never heals, despite medication and cleansing as shown in this case of a 4-year-old Pomeranian seen at Toa Payoh Vets in 2007. 

“I am sick and tired of cleaning this wound for the past many weeks,” Mrs Jaswant Singh pointed to the wound below the Pomeranian’s left eye. “I pour antibiotic powder and also gave antibiotics, but the wound keeps discharging dirty blood daily! My cat could have scratched my naughty baby causing this wound or something sharp had poked into his face!”

“This wound is a result of a tooth root infection,” I took out the Hills’ illustrated drawings of this common dental disease in dogs in Western countries. It is easier to show than to tell. I lifted the dog’s left upper cheek, but the carnassial tooth showed thick tartar and an inflamed gum. No pus and blood leaking out from the gums. “The permanent cure is to extract the rotten carnassial tooth. Antibiotics will not resolve the problem.”

“Just get on with the tooth extraction,” Mrs Singh showed me her dog’s discharge stain in her silk black sari with big red flowers. “My saris are very expensive as I buy them from New Delhi in India, not from the shops in Little India here! My baby keeps soiling them. I have to clean the soiled bed, sofas and mop the floor to remove her discharges for the past weeks! I have no maid to help me.”

“Hey, wait, wait, wait,” Mr Singh interjected. “Are you sure our dog suffers from carnal, cunning or whatever?”  As this was their first visit to Toa Payoh Vets, the husband eyed my diagnosis as money-making.

This doctor is talking nonsense,” Mr Singh whispered, not too softly in his wife’s ear. “The tooth and the wound are so far apart and separated by the sinus bones. How can infection travel so far? He must be nuts and out to make money from us!”

“I can take an X-ray to show you that the root or roots of the carnassial tooth is infected,” I said when Mr Singh turned towards me. “No need to do it,” the husband put up his hand. “Thank you very much. We will let you know if we want you to pull out the tooth.”

Around 2 months later, Mrs Singh consented to the dental extraction. There is the root canal and associated treatment, but it will be expensive. I extracted the loose left carnassial tooth and the first molar.

ADVICES TO DOG OWNERS:  
In the blink of an eye, 6 years passed by when Mrs Singh had her Pomeranian treated for bad teeth. “My dog’s facial sore healed within 10 days,” Mrs Singh reminisced. “Hence, I do not see you.” 
She did not get her dog’s teeth checked yearly as advised by me. Her dog had not suffered another carnassial tooth abscess in the right side but now had several loose and decayed teeth extracted.

Carnassial tooth abscess is also known as malar abscess or oro-nasal fistula. Some vets do mis-diagnose this disease as allergies or infected traumatic wounds. A spot-on usually accurate diagnosis is made if there is a festering non-healing facial wound below your dog’s eye. Dental extraction is the least expensive effective treatment. Yearly dental check ups will prevent most of your dog’s teeth from decaying so that your dog has teeth up to old age.

FOR MORE INFORMATION: Phone 6254-3326, 9668-6468,
judy@toapayohvets.com, www.toapayohvets.com

--------------------------------------------------------------------------


BE KIND TO PETS VETERINARY STORIES

DO DOGS SUFFER FROM TOOTHACHES?
The Carnassial Tooth Abscess
Dr Sing Kong Yuen, BVMS (Glasgow)






Dogs do suffer from toothaches. I will say that the most painful one must be the carnassial tooth
abscess. The canine carnassial tooth is the 4th premolar tooth. When there is chronic gingivitis, the bacteria destroys the periodontal ligaments attaching the tooth to the gums. Bacteria destroys the tooth and forms a carnassial tooth abscess. An abscess is a collection of pus.

Carnassial tooth abscess is a common disease in the older dog that has poor dental care. It is very painful. The presenting sign is a festering facial wound below the eye. Pus and blood seep out daily like an active volcano spewing hot lava and ash daily. Home remedies like antibiotic powder and silver cream or antibiotics are ineffective. Most owners think this is just a traumatic wound. But this open wound never heals, despite medication and cleansing as shown in this case of a 4-year-old Pomeranian seen at Toa Payoh Vets in 2007. 





“I am sick and tired of cleaning this wound for the past many weeks,” Mrs Jaswant Singh pointed to the wound below the Pomeranian’s left eye. “I pour antibiotic powder and also gave antibiotics, but the wound keeps discharging dirty blood daily! My cat could have scratched my naughty baby causing this wound or something sharp had poked into his face!”

“This wound is a result of a tooth root infection,” I took out the Hills’ illustrated drawings of this common dental disease in dogs in Western countries. It is easier to show than to tell. I lifted the dog’s left upper cheek, but the carnassial tooth showed thick tartar and an inflamed gum. No pus and blood leaking out from the gums. “The permanent cure is to extract the rotten carnassial tooth. Antibiotics will not resolve the problem.”

“Just get on with the tooth extraction,” Mrs Singh showed me her dog’s discharge stain in her silk black sari with big red flowers. “My saris are very expensive as I buy them from New Delhi in India, not from the shops in Little India here! My baby keeps soiling them. I have to clean the soiled bed, sofas and mop the floor to remove her discharges for the past weeks! I have no maid to help me.”

“Hey, wait, wait, wait,” Mr Singh interjected. “Are you sure our dog suffers from carnal, cunning or whatever?”  As this was their first visit to Toa Payoh Vets, the husband eyed my diagnosis as money-making.

This doctor is talking nonsense,” Mr Singh whispered, not too softly in his wife’s ear. “The tooth and the wound are so far apart and separated by the sinus bones. How can infection travel so far? He must be nuts and out to make money from us!”

“I can take an X-ray to show you that the root or roots of the carnassial tooth is infected,” I said when Mr Singh turned towards me. “No need to do it,” the husband put up his hand. “Thank you very much. We will let you know if we want you to pull out the tooth.”






Around 2 months later, Mrs Singh consented to the dental extraction. There is the root canal and associated treatment, but it will be expensive. I extracted the loose left carnassial tooth and the first molar. 








ADVICES TO DOG OWNERS:  
In the blink of an eye, 6 years passed by when Mrs Singh had her Pomeranian treated for bad teeth. “My dog’s facial sore healed within 10 days,” Mrs Singh reminisced. “Hence, I do not see you.”



She did not get her dog’s teeth checked yearly as advised by me. Her dog had not suffered another carnassial tooth abscess in the right side but now had several loose and decayed teeth extracted.

Carnassial tooth abscess is also known as malar abscess or oro-nasal fistula. Some vets do mis-diagnose this disease as allergies or infected traumatic wounds. A spot-on usually accurate diagnosis is made if there is a festering non-healing facial wound below your dog’s eye. Dental extraction is the least expensive effective treatment. Yearly dental check ups will prevent most of your dog’s teeth from decaying so that your dog has teeth up to old age.











FOR MORE INFORMATION: Phone 6254-3326, 9668-6468, 
judy@toapayohvets.com, www.toapayohvets.com


Reyna -
Try to make an entertaining fun educational video for pet owners and vet students.
you need to narrate the text in the images eg. X ray, in not a monotonous tone



------------------------------------------------------------

















4058. Carnassial tooth abscess in a 13 yo Jack Russell (twice), 17 yo Jack Russell -REYNA AND HSU

BE KIND TO PETS VETERINARY STORIES
Dr Sing Kong Yuen, BVMS (Glasgow)
Jan 19, 2020
--------------------------------------------------------------

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2dZOXrBI680
17-year-old Jack Russell has a carnassial tooth abscess






https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VPIL5Ftb0jM

17-year-old Jack Russell Pt 1/2



REYNA


https://www.youtube.com/audio?v=LuVRgp1a-Y0&nv=1
Final video: copyright music claim - Reyna to delete the music, replace the audio.



http://queensvets.blogspot.com/2016/04/12-dental-disease-13-year-old-jack.html
Reyna - to look into video making later. Has X rays and 2 occurrences of L and R carnassial tooth abscess. 






CANINE CARNASSIAL TOOTH

A carnassial tooth is located on both sides of the upper jaw in the position of the fourth premolars. Much larger than the rest of a dog’s teeth, the carnassial tooth is designed for breaking up and crushing hard food. When clients call for an urgent appointment referring to a swelling in front of their pet’s eye, the carnassial tooth is often the culprit.
Roots
While most canine teeth have only one or two roots, the carnassial tooth has three. Depending upon the size of the dog, the roots can be from ½ to ¾ of an inch long. Two of the roots are located in the front portion of the carnassial tooth, the third root is found at its back. Arising from below the gum line, the roots extend up and into the bone of the skull, resting just in front of the animal’s eye. 
Symptoms
Any tooth can become abscessed. An infection is caused when bacteria moves beneath the gumline to gain access to the tooth’s root. Signs of tooth infection typically include:
  • Halitosis
    • Caused by draining of abscess into the mouth
  • Redness or bleeding gums
  • Notable swelling along gumline at point of tooth root
  • White looking gums where pus has accumulated
  • Excessive drooling
  • Swollen face
  • Warmth at the site of swelling
  • Signs of tenderness and/or pain
  • Depression
  • Hesitation or refusal to eat
  • Tooth loss
    • Abscessed incisors often become loose and fall out
  • Nasal drainage
    • Infection of canine teeth may drain out nasal passages
However, when the carnassial tooth abscesses, the first noticeable symptom is often a hard lump or swelling immediately beneath the dog’s eye. Because the swelling’s location is not one typically thought of as involving a tooth, clients often feel the cause of swelling is related to an insect bite or an allergic reaction, and will leave the swelling to heal on its own.
Typically, only one of the three roots will become infected. In most cases, it is the root located in front and closest to the skin. As the infection strengthens and the swelling grows, the abscess will eventually:
  • Burst through the skin surface immediately below the eye
  • Drain contents of infected blood and pus out onto the cheek
  • Diminish in pain
Left untreated, the infection of an abscessed carnassial tooth will eventually:
  • Create intense pain
  • Spread bacterial infection to the eye
    • Putting the animal at risk for loss of vision
  • Spread bacterial infection to other teeth
    • Increasing the chance for the further loss of teeth
  • Spread bacteria into the bloodstream
    • Causing infection to other areas, for example, bones or heart
Diagnosis
Steps to confirm a diagnosis include:
  • Observation of facial swelling
  • Observation of drainage wounds
  • Visible periodontal disease
    • Not always—some animals will still have healthy looking gums
  • X-ray
    • Will show an abscess most typically on a single root
Treatment
In most cases, the options for treatment include:
  • Extraction of the diseased tooth
    • Removal of the tooth exposes the abscess, allows the infection to drain, and the site to be cleaned
  • Root canal
    • Choice is dependent upon the type and the cause of damage to the tooth
    • Offers the option to save the tooth
    • Is more costly to the client
  • Antibiotic therapy
    • Will typically not be enough to completely clear up the infection
    • Is necessary to combat the chance for further future bacterial growth
Restorative Dentistry
Restoration methods involving an abscessed carnassial tooth can be completed, but the materials to use should be considered carefully to determine that they will be able to withstand the functional need of the animal
When a carnassial tooth abscesses, the health of the animal requires immediate veterinary care as the treatment will require either root canal therapy or extraction. Without it, even with appropriate antibiotics, the infection will remain active and the tooth will abscess again.
If you are interested in learning more about methods of canine dental care, please contact your Covetrus representative at 855.724.3461.
Source:



http://queensvets.blogspot.com/2016/04/12-dental-disease-13-year-old-jack.html