Tuesday, March 30, 2021

3573. A 4-month-old red-eared slider stops eating and swims lop-sided

 

Video - swimming lop-sided 2 weeks after purchase as a 3-month-old from a pet shop.








Anorexia, inactive for the past few days






The owner did not use this small filter as she
thinks it is not effective.









She has not provided shade for this slider to hide when 
he needs to get away from the ultraviolet light rays from 7 pm to 11 pm.












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Turtles are becoming increasingly popular, but housing them can be difficult. Fish tanks do not provide them with the dry space they need and outdoor ponds expose them to threats from potential predators. If you have the space and the skills, building an indoor pond could be a great option for your turtle. Keep in mind the rule of thumb for the size is 10 gallons (37.9 L) per inch of shell. An indoor pond can be a decorative addition to your home and consists of a pre-formed pond that you can purchase in a variety of shapes and sizes, a basking area, and a frame.


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SUMMARY —

  • Red-eared sliders need an area of dry land to warm up and dry off.
  • The basking platform should be (at minimum) large enough for the turtle’s entire body to leave the water.
  • They also need a land area big enough for the turtle to walk about and lay eggs (if applicable).
  • Heat and UVB lamps should be placed directly above the basking spot.
  • The best way to provide a basking area for your turtle is to create an artificial shoreline.
  • When properly built, above-tank basking platforms can be suitable.
  • Basking islands are acceptable, but best used with an artificial shoreline.
  • Avoid using store-bought basking platforms whenever possible.

Thursday, March 25, 2021

Hair loss in non-primates - A syrian hamster has back alopecia

Alopecia: Possible Causes and Treatments, Particularly in Captive Nonhuman Primates

Link:

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2703143/





 Here we consider 3 scenarios representing what might be the more common causes of hair loss in nonhuman primates and possible treatments.

Scenario 1.

If increased scratching is observed along with reddened skin, and biopsies have ruled out bacterial, fungal, or parasitic infections, then the most likely diagnosis is atopic dermatitis. If the source of the allergen cannot be identified and removed, then several treatment options are available depending on the research protocol. For nonhuman primates, treatment with oral steroids or cyclosporine should be considered. We successfully treated 1 aged female monkey with pronounced total-body hair loss, inflamed skin, and pruritis by administering dexamethasone orally for a period of several months, during the latter part of which the dosage was gradually reduced. Treatment was effective in restoring full body hair, and her coat has been maintained for well more than 1 year after treatment.

Scenario 2.

If the hair loss is self-induced (by hair pulling) and skin biopsies have ruled out inflammation and bacterial, fungal, and parasitic infections, then a tentative diagnosis is psychogenic or stress-induced hair loss. If the stressor cannot be identified and removed (possible sources include experimental procedures, husbandry practices, and other animals, among others), then 2 strategies might be useful. The first is an enrichment strategy in which the environment is modified to provide the animal with greater stimulation. Such changes might include pair housing. The second is a pharmacotherapeutic strategy in which the animal is treated for anxiety by using anxiolytic drugs such as diazepam. However, no systematic studies show that either of these strategies is completely effective in eliminating hair-pulling behavior. Moreover, any proposed treatments for alopecia must be compatible with the research protocol under which the animal is being studied.

Scenario 3.

If behavioral correlates of the hair loss are not apparent and skin biopsies reveal no evidence of skin inflammation or the presence of bacterial, fungal, or parasitic infections or alterations in hair follicle biology, then other factors have to be considered in the diagnosis. Three such factors include seasonal variation, reproduction, and age. Seasonal or pregnancy related-hair loss should resolve within 4 to 8 mo without treatment. If none of these factors is related to the hair loss or if the hair loss does not resolve, then hormonal imbalances and nutritional deficits should be ruled out. If the hair loss appears to be a natural consequence of aging, no treatment is currently available to ameliorate this condition in nonhuman primates.

Conclusions

A variety of factors are known to produce hair loss in mammals and, more specifically nonhuman primates. Some of these factors are rare, accounting for only a small percentage of monkeys that show alopecia; others are probably much more common. In general, little is known about the prevalence of different types of hair loss in captive nonhuman primates, in part because of a tendency to view hair loss in this mammalian order as a unitary phenomenon related to stress. Identifying the causes of hair loss in individual primates depends on an assessment approach involving health exams, skin biopsies, blood screening, and behavioral observations. Knowing the cause is crucial to establishing effective treatment regimens. However, hair loss also can result from several causative factors working in concert. Furthermore, much remains unknown about treatment. Whereas some forms of alopecia can be treated (for example, hair loss associated with hypothyroidism), well established treatments are not available for other forms (for example, hair loss associated with hair pulling). In fact, simply monitoring the animal may be the best approach when underlying medical causes are ruled out and other clinical signs such as dermatitis or pruritus are absent. Finally, some forms of hair loss cannot be remediated (for example, mutations of the hairless gene, hair loss in some animals as a result of old age), and therefore alopecia most likely will never completely be eliminated from captive nonhuman primate populations. These problems underscore the need for future research on the causes of hair loss in nonhuman primates, not only to benefit their condition but also to develop new biomedical models to advance our understanding of alopecia in humans.

Tuesday, March 23, 2021

3571. Ironing is a chore

 An ironing center or steam ironing station is a device consisting of a clothes iron and a separate steam-generating tank. By having a separate tank, the ironing unit can generate more steam than a conventional iron, making steam ironing faster. Such ironing facilities take longer to warm up than conventional irons, and cost more.


 Heavier irons were meant for industrial or commercial applications. The use of electricity in irons was a useful advance: they no longer had to be heated over a stove or by charco

Dry iron 1990, rounded



Ergonomic, dry [non-steam] industrial iron with a special rounded base.
Perfect for lining ironing in finished clothes, with application of water haze. Attention: do not use the steam irons for lining ironing of finished clothes.

Dry iron can also be used for ironing silk, which can not be washed with water and ironed with steam iron. The dry irons you can use for joining fliselin and little elements.

The heater 900W (230V, 50Hz), comfortable handle, bimetallic temperature regulator, weight 1,7kg. It is applied without PTFE shoes.
The fitting elements: balancer SB-2000 (reducing the iron weight), iron hanger no. 20127. DECAPFER is recommend for iron cleaning.

Saturday, March 20, 2021

BUSINESS TIPS - LESSONS FROM NATURE

The White-collared Kingfisher (Todiramphus chloris) belongs to the family Halcyonidae, the tree kingfishers. It usually hunts from a perch such as a fence over an open space. It feeds on fishes, insects, worms and lizards. 

21 Mar 2021. LESSONS FROM NATURE by Dr Sing Kong Yuen

A good business development manager lists the prospective clients from his office and meets the targeted buyers in person. If he stays in his office daily and TGIF (Thanks God Its Friday), he’s just like a perched kingfisher, except that his boss is feeding him for non performance!




Monday, March 15, 2021

3569. Merchandise - caps for restaurants



INCREASE YOUR BUSINESS REVENUE

Merchandise are goods that are bought and sold. My commercial company makes a wide selection of high quality headwear - coverings for the head, such as hats, caps and berets.
CONTACT: Dr David Sing,  +65 9668-6468, 99pups@gmail.com   @davidsing1

 



16 Mar 2021.

Recently I had a good lunch at Lokkee Restaurant, Plaza Singapura and was attracted by the sole red cap “Make Chinese Food Great Again” displayed at the entrance. They were sold in 2017-2019 at S$20.00 per piece. Now they are out of stock. They are good quality caps and will make great gifts offline for diners and  online for a global audience.

















Saturday, March 13, 2021

3568. Sunset on Thursday 11 Mar 2021. crepuscular rays.

Crepuscular rays are beams of sunlight that pass through gaps in the clouds and are made more visible by dust, smoke and other particles in the air.  They can be formed when sun rays stream through a massive obstruction such as a mountain. The sunbeams originate when the sun is below the horizon, during twilight hours.


Latin word: Crepusculum" means twilight. A remarkable sight of sun rays diverging from one point across the sky.  

Thursday, March 11, 2021

3567. An 8-year-old female red-eared slider has rectal prolapse.

 HISTORY

16 Jan 2021. First prolapse. Vet 1 diagnosed as rectal prolapse. X-ray available. No image. Pushed in. Purse-string suture.  

26 Jan 2021. Second prolapse.  Vet 1 diagnosed as rectal prolapse. Owner's images x 4. Pushed in. Purse-string suture. 

7 Mar 2021. Toa Payoh Vets. Dr Daniel Sing resected a 4-inch rectal prolapse. 


3 sliders lived in one big tank. Filters and basking platform. Fed one tablespoon of pellets per day in same tank. Water changed once a week. Very murky. Can't see if there were eggs laid.

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The next task, identifying the prolapsed tissue, is sometimes easier said than done. Prolapses are often chronic in nature by the time the reptile is presented for medical care.

    • In a mild prolapse, only cloacal tissue may bulge through the vent or the opening through which droppings and reproductive products are expelled from the cloaca. Cloacal mucosa normally appears smooth and shiny although prolapsed tissue will become swollen over time.
    • The distal gastrointestinal tract has a smooth, tubular appearance. In some instances feces are also observed.
    • The hemipenes in squamates or phallus in chelonians is a relatively solid tissue that originates from the lateral portion of the cloacal wall (Fig 2)
  • The lumen of the oviduct gives this tissue a “donut-like” appearance. Longitudinal folds can also be observed on the oviductal wall.
  • Of course the urinary bladder is a thin walled, often fluid filled, structure.


Rectal prolapse occurs when the rectum (the last section of the large intestine) falls from its normal position within the pelvic area and sticks out through the anus. (The word "prolapse" means a falling down or slipping of a body part from its usual position.)











Complications include:

  • Strangulated prolapse: This occurs when part of rectum becomes trapped and cuts off the blood supply, causing tissue to die. This can develop gangrene, and the area will turn black and drop off. It is rare and requires surgery.
  • Solitary rectal ulcer syndrome: Present in mucosal prolapse, ulcers can develop on the part of the rectum sticking out. This complication often requires surgery.
  • Recurring prolapse: People who have surgery for rectal prolapse may have another prolapse at some point in the future.


Prolapse occurs when the rectum becomes unattached inside the body and comes out through the anus, effectively turning itself inside out.

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ORIGINAL IMAGES







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Rectal prolapse is when part of the rectum protrudes from the anus. The rectum is the last part of the large intestine and is where feces is stored before being passed.

There are two general types of surgery for rectal prolapse:

  • Abdominal: Entry through the belly through a cut or several cuts in the abdominal wall. Often used for full-thickness prolapse.
  • Perineal: Involves cutting out the full thickness segment of the prolapsing rectum. Suitable for people who cannot have a general anesthetic.

Complications include:

  • Strangulated prolapse: This occurs when part of rectum becomes trapped and cuts off the blood supply, causing tissue to die. This can develop gangrene, and the area will turn black and drop off. It is rare and requires surgery.
  • Solitary rectal ulcer syndrome: Present in mucosal prolapse, ulcers can develop on the part of the rectum sticking out. This complication often requires surgery.
  • Recurring prolapse: People who have surgery for rectal prolapse may have another prolapse at some point in the future.


Prolapse occurs when the rectum becomes unattached inside the body and comes out through the anus, effectively turning itself inside out.

Complications include:

  • Strangulated prolapse: This occurs when part of rectum becomes trapped and cuts off the blood supply, causing tissue to die. This can develop gangrene, and the area will turn black and drop off. It is rare and requires surgery.
  • Solitary rectal ulcer syndrome: Present in mucosal prolapse, ulcers can develop on the part of the rectum sticking out. This complication often requires surgery.
  • Recurring prolapse: People who have surgery for rectal prolapse may have another prolapse at some point in the future.


Prolapse occurs when the rectum becomes unattached inside the body and comes out through the anus, effectively turning itself inside out.


If you or your child has a rectal prolapseyou may be able to push the prolapse back into place as soon as it occurs.


If left untreated, possible complications of rectal prolapse include: Ulceration and bleeding. A reduction in blood supply causing strangulation of the rectum. Gangrene, resulting in death and decay of the strangulated section of the rectum.


Signs and symptoms of moderate to severe uterine prolapse include:

  1. Sensation of heaviness or pulling in your pelvis.
  2. Tissue protruding from your vagina.
  3. Urinary problems, such as urine leakage (incontinence) or urine retention.
  4. Trouble having a bowel movement.
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TURTLE

Prolapse

There are 3 common types of prolapse: rectal, penile, and intestinal. This occurs when the organs slip out of the turtle’s cloacal opening and become stuck there. This is very dangerous and requires immediate action, as the affected tissue can become traumatized, desiccated (dried out), or suffer other ill effects from compromised blood flow. Furthermore, prolapsed tissue may be attacked by tankmates, who may mistake it for something to eat.

Symptoms

  • Pink/red/purple flesh hanging out of cloaca and not retracting

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Reproductive

Female birds have a reproductive tract on the left side only. The oviduct is a tubular structure with longitudinal folds that are usually visible on the lumen. Prolapses are generally associated with egg laying, although rarely they may be associated with masses/tumors of the reproductive tract. When prolapsed, the tissue may become edematous, but a lumen should be clearly identifiable, and in most cases it will be possible to see the longitudinal folds. The tissue should appear on the left side of the bird, and the cloacal lining itself should also be evident and normal, with the prolapsed tissue protruding through the cloacal cavity.

Treatment of reproductive tract prolapse is always directed at identification and resolution of the primary disease process. In most cases, this will be associated with egg laying. It is essential to thoroughly evaluate for the presence of a retained egg or egg fragments. Radiographs should always be performed, but can be misleading if the egg shell is not mineralized. Ultrasound is very useful for detection of eggs, as well as follicular activity and ovarian or uterine masses. In cases where there appears to be caudodorsal enlargement or a mass effect, or the location of enlargement cannot be determined, then contrast radiographs can be useful in differentiating the intestines and the region of enlargement/mass. If there is an obvious egg within the prolapsed mass, then it can be collapsed or surgically removed. Salpingohysterectomy is recommended to prevent future episodes of egg retention and prolapse.

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The cloaca, or vent, in reptiles is the slit opening under the tail. The digestive tract, the reproductive system and the bladder all empty out the same cloacal opening.

Reptiles will sometimes prolapse (slip out of place) tissues out through this opening. Cloacal prolapse refers to any condition involving tissue protruding from the reptile’s vent, where feces come out. Prolapsed tissues from the cloaca can have a variety of origins, including the gastrointestinal tract (colon, large and small intestines), urinary bladder, phallus (alligator, crocodiles, turtles, tortoises), hemipenis (snakes and lizards), and the oviduct (the organ where eggs and young are held). In rare cases the kidneys have been known to prolapse from the vent.

  • Oviductal prolapses in females are usually caused by failure to give birth or lay eggs (dystocia, egg binding)

  • Prolapses of the colon, large intestine and small intestines usually result from infections with parasites, bacteria or constipation

  • Urinary bladder prolapses usually are caused by a bladder stone.

Cloacal prolapses occur in any age reptile of any species and of any sex. They are commonly seen in high-producing, egg-laying species. Risk factors include collections or individuals with husbandry deficiencies, especially low-calcium and low-mineral diets.

On physical examination, it is usually easy to determine that a reptile has a prolapse; there will be tissue protruding from the cloacal opening. The difficulty is determining what tissue is prolapsed and why. These are important questions that your veterinarian will try and answer so the proper treatment and prevention can be accomplished. Other abnormal findings that may be found on exam are dehydration, poor-body condition and weakness.

Diagnosis

Your veterinarian will take a detailed diet and husbandry history and perform a physical exam. In many cases, the type of tissue that is prolapsed will be identified on sight. However, your veterinarian may want to do some additional testing to determine the prolapse has occurred. The tests suggested may include a fecal exam to look for parasites; X-rays to check for metabolic bone disease, tumors or bladder stones; and a blood panel to look for sign of infection. In some cases, your veterinarian may suggest some advanced testing such as an endoscopy, during which the veterinarian puts a small camera into the cloaca to see what is going on), an MRI or CT scans.

Treatment

Prolapses are generally treated as emergencies. Treatment should begin as soon as possible. Your veterinarian will likely instruct you to “protect” the protruding tissue by wrapping it is a soft, moist cloth such as a towel while on your way into the clinic.

Once the type of tissue that is protruding is identified, your veterinarian will attempt to replace the tissue back into its normal location and position. The tissue will be cleaned and lubricated and gently massaged back into the cloaca, often using a cotton tipped applicator. If the tissue is swollen, your veterinarian may use a concentrated sugar solution or gentle pressure to help reduce the size of tissue before replacing it into the cloaca. It is common for the tissue of the phallus or hemipenes to be necrotic, and if this is the case your veterinarian may want to amputate these organs. Reptiles only use the phallus and hemipenes for reproduction, and not for urination, so you can remove it and it the animal can still live a healthy life.

To prevent the tissue from prolapsing again, the veterinarian will often suture each side of the vent to make the opening smaller. This allows the reptile to defecate but prevents the tissue from re-prolapsing. These sutures may be left in place for three to four weeks.

Depending on what your veterinarian finds might be the cause of the prolapse, a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) may be prescribed to help with the swollen tissue. Other treatments that your veterinarian may discuss based on the type of tissue that prolapsed and the cause may include husbandry changes (diet, lighting and temperatures), surgery to prevent future prolapses (bladder stone removal, spaying mass or tumor removal), and antibiotics for infections. It is critical to give all medications just as prescribed by your veterinarian and to return for all re-check exams scheduled.

Prognosis

There is a good chance of a complete recovery if the prolapse is recent, and a cause can be identified and corrected. Phallus, hemipenis, bladder and oviduct prolapses generally are more easily corrected and treated. The chance for a cure is reduced if the prolapse has been going on for more than 24 hours and if there is damage to the prolapsed organ or tissue. The most difficult to treat, and thus the ones with the least chance for a cure, are prolapses that involve the colon or the large intestine.

Prevention

There are many reasons that cloacal prolapses can occur but the most common are from husbandry problems. A detailed review and discussion with your veterinarian is a great start. Any husbandry problems identified should be corrected so that future prolapses are minimized. Unfortunately, once a prolapse has occurred there is a greater risk for another prolapse in the future.


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The next task, identifying the prolapsed tissue, is sometimes easier said than done. Prolapses are often chronic in nature by the time the reptile is presented for medical care.

    • In a mild prolapse, only cloacal tissue may bulge through the vent or the opening through which droppings and reproductive products are expelled from the cloaca. Cloacal mucosa normally appears smooth and shiny although prolapsed tissue will become swollen over time.
    • The distal gastrointestinal tract has a smooth, tubular appearance. In some instances feces are also observed.
    • The hemipenes in squamates or phallus in chelonians is a relatively solid tissue that originates from the lateral portion of the cloacal wall (Fig 2)
  • The lumen of the oviduct gives this tissue a “donut-like” appearance. Longitudinal folds can also be observed on the oviductal wall.
  • Of course the urinary bladder is a thin walled, often fluid filled, structure.

Seminal or hemipenal plugs consist of keratinized material that fills one or both hemipenes. These plugs can protrude from the cloaca and can be mistaken for a prolapse in squamates. Visit Anapsid.org for a color photograph of seminal plugs.



Case management

Diagnostics

The diagnosis of prolapse relies on physical examination, however additional testing is often required to identify the underlying cause. The tests performed will vary with the tissue prolapsed but can include:

  • Survey whole body or abdominal radiographs
  • Fecal parasite testing
  • Complete blood count/biochemistry panel

Management of the prolapse

Management of prolapsed tissue should almost always be performed under sedation or general anesthesia. Use a local anesthetic when general anesthesia s not used for reduction of a mild cloacal prolapse. Clean the exposed tissue with saline or dilute chlorhexidine solution. Removing superficial crust and debris as needed. Administer fluids and begin analgesic therapy such as an anti-inflammatory agent. Synthetic absorbable suture such as polyglyconate or polydioxanone is often selected.

Cloacal prolapse:

Once the swelling is down and the tissue is clean, carefully and gently Invert and return prolapsed tissue using a relatively large diameter, blunt instrument like a rubber catheter, syringe case, or sexing probe. NEVER simply “stuff” tissues back into the cloaca. Tissues should invert back inside in an anatomically correct orientation, like a sock being turned inside out. Devitalized tissue may require resection.

Place stay sutures after the prolapse is reduced. A purse-string suture is often placed in chelonians or larger squamates, while transverse cloacal sutures such as horizontal mattress serve well in many snakes and lizards. Stay sutures decrease the size of the opening to prevent recurrent tissue prolapse, but should remain loose enough to allow droppings to pass. Stay sutures are typically left in place for 3 to 5 days.

Visit Herp Center Network for images illustrating gastrointestinal tract reduction in a bearded dragon (Pogona vitticeps).

Oviductal prolapse:

Mild oviductal prolapses can be reduced transcloacally. More severe prolapses require a surgical approach performed by a reptile veterinarian. Traumatized tissue may need to be removed intraoperatively, however if this is necessary then ovariectomy on the same side should also be recommended to reduce to risk of yolk coelomitis.

Penile prolapse:

Prolapsed copulatory organs quickly become traumatized and swollen, making reduction near impossible in many cases. Recurrent prolapses or when prolapsed tissue is nonviable or cannot be reduced, the phallus or hemipenis can be amputated. Fortunately the urinary system is separate from phallus since the ureters empty into the cloaca so this will not compromise the reptile’s ability to urinate. Additionally, when one hemipenis is retained in squamates, future reproduction is still possible.

Make sure the prolapsed copulatory organ is fully everted. In small chelonians, place a ligature proximal to damaged tissue. Ligate tissues with transfixing, circumferential, or vertical mattress patterns. The phallus is then transected and removed (Innis 2002). In larger chelonians, the lateral vessels as well as each corpus cavernosum should be ligated separately. Transect and remove the prolapsed tissue, then replace the stump into the tail base. Afterwards a stay suture like a purse string suture is left in place for up to 2 to 3 weeks (Sykes 2010, Barten 2006, Denardo 2006).

After the prolapse has been reduced

After the prolapse has been reduced, begin systemic antibiotics if infection is present and the keep the patient well hydrated. A stool softener can also be useful in lizards.

 

Prognosis and follow-up

Prognosis depends on the patient’s overall condition, viability and duration of the prolapsed tissue, as well as the cause of prolapse. If the underlying cause of prolapse has not been identified and resolved, there is a good chance that prolapse will recur. Refer “mystery” prolapse patients to a reptile veterinarian for additional diagnostics.

References
















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13 Jan 2021

MY VIDEO: 

Consultation and examination of the slider, before diagnosis and surgery.

https://youtu.be/Fpd6oa8eZWY



9 Mar 2021. Follow up video. The slider had fully recovered and is normal. Owner sends me the video as at 9 Mar 2021.




REFERENCE:

 

MORE IMAGES IN THE BLOG:

https://2010vets.blogspot.com/2021/03/3563-red-eared-slider-has-oviduct.html


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Consultation and discussion about vent prolapse in a red-eared slider. The other slider had bitten the end of the vent when he saw some tissues dangling out, during egg laying.

Vent prolapse can be one of the 3 situations: Rectal prolapse, bladder prolapse and oviduct prolapse. DIFFERENTIAL DIAGNOSIS: 1. Bladder prolapse - thin walled bladder will be seen. This prolapse is thick walled. 2. Rectal prolapse. Stool pellets may be visible or absent. The lumen is present as in this case. Usually the rectal prolapse has thinner walls. 3. Oviduct prolapse. The lumen is present. Thicker muscular walls. History of egg laying recently. The red-eared slider had bitten and pulled the oviduct causing it to come out of the vent. It was traumatised and infected. SURGERY. The prolapsed oviduct mass was amputated. The red-eared slider led a normal life after surgery. VIDEO OF CONSULTATION AT:






 

This webpage is:

https://2010vets.blogspot.com/2021/03/3563-red-eared-slider-has-oviduct.html






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VIDEO OF CONSULTATION AT:

This video is about the consultation and discussion about vent prolapse in a red-eared slider. The other slider had bitten the end of the vent when he saw some tissues dangling out, during egg laying. Vent prolapse can be one of the 3 situations: Rectal prolapse, bladder prolapse and oviduct prolapse. DIFFERENTIAL DIAGNOSIS: 1. Bladder prolapse - thin walled bladder will be seen. This prolapse is thick walled. 2. Rectal prolapse. Stool pellets may be visible or absent. The lumen is present as in this case. Usually the rectal prolapse has thinner walls. 3. Oviduct prolapse. The lumen is present. Thicker muscular walls. History of egg laying recently. The red-eared slider had bitten and pulled the oviduct causing it to come out of the vent. It was traumatised and infected. SURGERY. The prolapsed oviduct mass was amputated. The red-eared slider led a normal life after surgery.

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[11:32 PM, 1/12/2021] +65  5989: Hi, is this Judy? 
I saw your contact online in regards to turtle and I am experiencing a situation that seems like the other turtle (tank mate) just bite this one
[11:33 PM, 1/12/2021] David Sing: Pl send 3 images

But this is smth we have not seen before. We seen broken eggs so I am not sure this is hurt during mating, laying egg or truly biting..

[11:37 PM, 1/12/2021] David Sing: Show front and upside down images
[11:37 PM, 1/12/2021] +65  5989: Front as in the face?
[11:37 PM, 1/12/2021] David Sing: Yes

He couldnt stay still so thought video

Is this a female or male? I need to see the claws

[11:40 PM, 1/12/2021] +65     5989: Can see the claw?
[11:41 PM, 1/12/2021] +65  5989: I had two bigger ones - one male and one female, but I dont know which one is male and which one is female..
[11:43 PM, 1/12/2021] +65  5989: Hopefully this video helps you to see the details that you need..


[11:43 PM, 1/12/2021] David Sing: Looks like female. Has short claws, Has she laid eggs
[11:44 PM, 1/12/2021] +65  5989: She has laid before, and just now there was about one or two cracked white eggs inside..
[11:45 PM, 1/12/2021] David Sing: This confirms she is female. Egg binding likely. Bring to Toa Payoh Vets tomorrow for exam and treatment


Owner sends Google Map of location of Toa Payoh Vets -


[11:49 PM, 1/12/2021] David Sing: Yes. I shall inform Dr Daniel
[11:50 PM, 1/12/2021] +65  5989: Do you need to see both? Or just bring the injured one will do?
[11:51 PM, 1/12/2021] David Sing: Both
[11:52 PM, 1/12/2021] +65  5989: Last question, can the injured one go back to water? Or tonight no water is better?
[11:57 PM, 1/12/2021] David Sing: No water
[11:58 PM, 1/12/2021] David Sing: Put on cloth
[12:08 AM, 1/13/2021] +65  5989: Thanks!










DR SING K Y FOLLOWED UP ON 9 MAR 2021.
Owner sent a video showing RES fully recovered.

1. Had been warded 6 days.
3. Passed stools one week after going home.

[6:30 AM, 3/10/2021] David Sing: Thank you very much for sharing good news about your slider
[8:14 AM, 3/10/2021] +65  5989: Most welcome.. :)