Monday, October 26, 2015

2343. The economical vet and old non-neutered male dog diseases - tail gland diseases and circumanal tumours.

Oct 27, 2015


I recorded one case of tail gland disease in a Siberian Husky in 2009 as follows:
http://www.bekindtopets.com/dogs/20091066Tail_Gland_Disease_Male_Husky_ToaPayohVets.htm

Today, another case of a male 15-year-old X-bred came in and was  seen with Dr Daniel in the afternoon . The owners said that their vet charges only $1,000 all in to remove the much swollen tail end tumour now infested with maggots. Many months ago, the vet had proposed tail amputation plus neutering but the owners did not accept the advice. The tail growth enlarged to the size of an orange and becomes infested with maggots.

The owner could not remove all maggots as the dog was ferocious and contacted me by sms.

I suggested a Tardak injection plus antibiotics and painkillers before tail amputation 1 week later so that the tail would not be severely inflamed and infected. Amputation of an infected tail end will result in very poor wound healing. But the father wanted surgery today - tail amputation which would have done away with the need for removal of maggots on the gigantic growth.


"He is only a cross-bred," the father said. "I don't want to spend $1,000 treating this case. I am looking for an economical vet."

Since he was guaranteed by the first vet that the total cost would be only $1,000, he decided to go back to the first vet. "If he is more expensive, I will come back to you. I am looking for an economical vet."

I had quoted him $500 for amputation of an injured not infected tail but this was a much longer surgery with complications.

Last 3 days,  I was seeing more older dog health problems  from new clients.

Two recent cases of circumanal tumours in a 13-year-old Siberian Husky and in a 12-year-old English Cocker Spaniel. The former was quite inoperable with 3 large circum-anal tumours. The latter had a 1.5 cm tumour which would be easy to operate and remove but the owner cited "anaesthetic risks of dying" and so opted for the Tardak injections instead of surgery and neutering.



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