Saturday, July 26, 2014

1428. Yesin Vet University talk to final year students. Aug 11, 2014 - tips on neutering

July 27, 2014

TALK TO FINAL YEAR VET STUDENTS - YESIN VET UNIVERSITY, MYANMAR



Employee vets
Each vet has his or her own way of doing surgery and using anaesthesia and sutures.

 Case study of post-op complications: Neutering of a poodle in Toa Payoh Vets.

MY SURGICAL TECHNIQUE
Day surgery
Age: 6 months and above
With-holding food and water: 10 hours before admission in the morning

1. Prepare for surgery, knowing the standard operature procedure as follows:

1. Physical examination, body weight and rectal temperature for fever.
2. Blood test to screen the health of the dog. Optional.
3. Palpate and express urinary bladder if it is full.
4. Pre-scrotal area clipped in preparation room.
5. I/V Domitor + Ketamine  based on Domitor 0.4 ml + Ketamine 0.5 ml for a young 10-kg dog.
6. Isoflurane + Oxygen gas top up if necessary.
7. Incise pre-scrotal area. Not too high up. Incision 1.5 -2 cm for small breed.
8. Expose testicle.
9. Clamp and cut cremaster muscle ligament.
10.3-haemostats clamping.  Ligate twice for spermatic vessels.
11. Stitch skin 3 stitches. Starting from the middle of the wound.

Illustration. 



Economics

Polysorb 2/0 or 3/0  one packet  S$12.80 = 9,216 kyats
Monosyn 2/0 or 3/0 one packet  S$12.40 = 8, 928 kyats
One S$= 720 kyats

CASE STUDY
3 weeks post-neuter. Complaint of vomiting now and then.
Dog is active, eats well, no fever.
No pain in surgical area of pre-scrotal.
Bites or growls when couple touches the pre-scrotal area
Sedate  D+K 0.05 + 0.06 ml IV
Clean
Prescrotal area preferred rather than over the bulb.  2/0 polysorb. Too tight?  Remove stitches
Deep and buried - stitch abscess? No pain on palpation but dog bites/growls owner who attempted to clean the wound.

Inguinal right. 3/0 monosyn filament. No inflammation. Stitches taken out.










VIDEO

CONCLUSION
Post-op complications like infection or stitch abscess do occur.
Economics is important as rentals and staff overheads increase yearly.
Much depends on

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